REST V2 by Bitcoin.com - BCH RPC over HTTP

Microcash - General Discussion

Microcash is a new form of cryptographic currency, currently under development. Bitcoin has been a genius proof-of-concept and proof-of-adoption digital commodity. The Microcash project hopes to vastly improve upon the distributed cryptographic currency idea with numerous innovations that current crypto-currencies cannot implement due to the nature of the bitcoin protocol.
[link]

Why am I getting exit code 1 after stopping bitcoin RPC server? /r/Bitcoin

Why am I getting exit code 1 after stopping bitcoin RPC server? /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Why am I getting exit code 1 after stopping bitcoin RPC server?

This is how I'm starting and stopping bitcoin from a service unit
[Service] ExecStart=/usbin/bitcoind -daemon=0 -datadir=/home/jsonrpc/bitcoin -conf=/home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/settings.conf ExecStop=/usbin/bitcoin-cli -datadir=/home/jsonrpc/bitcoin -conf=/home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/settings.conf stop 
And this is what I get when I stop the service:
Shutdown requested. Exiting. Interrupting HTTP RPC server Interrupting RPC Shutdown: In progress... Stopping HTTP RPC server Stopping RPC RPC stopped. scheduler thread interrupt Shutdown: done bitcoin.service: Main process exited, code=exited, status=1/FAILURE 
debug.log
2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Bitcoin Core version v0.17.0.0-ge1ed37edaedc85b8c3468bd9a726046344036243 (release build) 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z InitParameterInteraction: parameter interaction: -whitelistforcerelay=1 -> setting -whitelistrelay=1 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Assuming ancestors of block 0000000000000000002e63058c023a9a1de233554f28c7b21380b6c9003f36a8 have valid signatures. 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Setting nMinimumChainWork=0000000000000000000000000000000000000000028822fef1c230963535a90d 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using the 'standard' SHA256 implementation 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Default data directory /home/jsonrpc/.bitcoin 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using data directory /home/jsonrpc/bitcoin 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using config file /home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/settings.conf 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using at most 4 automatic connections (1024 file descriptors available) 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using 16 MiB out of 32/2 requested for signature cache, able to store 524288 elements 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using 16 MiB out of 32/2 requested for script execution cache, able to store 524288 elements 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using 0 threads for script verification 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z HTTP: creating work queue of depth 16 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Starting RPC 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Starting HTTP RPC server 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Config options rpcuser and rpcpassword will soon be deprecated. Locally-run instances may remove rpcuser to use cookie-based auth, or may be replaced with rpcauth. Please see share/rpcauth for rpcauth auth generation. 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z HTTP: starting 2 worker threads 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using wallet directory /home/jsonrpc/bitcoin 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z init message: Verifying wallet(s)... 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using BerkeleyDB version Berkeley DB 4.8.30: (April 9, 2010) 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z Using wallet wallet.dat 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z BerkeleyEnvironment::Open: LogDir=/home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/database ErrorFile=/home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/db.log 2018-11-21T18:02:16Z scheduler thread start 2018-11-21T18:02:24Z Cache configuration: 2018-11-21T18:02:24Z * Using 2.0MiB for block index database 2018-11-21T18:02:24Z * Using 8.0MiB for chain state database 2018-11-21T18:02:24Z * Using 40.0MiB for in-memory UTXO set (plus up to 286.1MiB of unused mempool space) 2018-11-21T18:02:24Z init message: Loading block index... 2018-11-21T18:02:24Z Opening LevelDB in /home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/blocks/index 2018-11-21T18:02:25Z Opened LevelDB successfully 2018-11-21T18:02:25Z Using obfuscation key for /home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/blocks/index: 0000000000000000 2018-11-21T18:03:38Z LoadBlockIndexDB: last block file = 1425 2018-11-21T18:03:38Z LoadBlockIndexDB: last block file info: CBlockFileInfo(blocks=71, size=79377521, heights=549167...549288, time=2018-11-07...2018-11-08) 2018-11-21T18:03:38Z Checking all blk files are present... 2018-11-21T18:03:47Z Opening LevelDB in /home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/chainstate 2018-11-21T18:03:47Z Opened LevelDB successfully 2018-11-21T18:03:48Z Using obfuscation key for /home/jsonrpc/bitcoin/chainstate: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 2018-11-21T18:03:50Z Loaded best chain: hashBestChain=0000000000000000001d43d5aeb32c7d5158e48da84b896413e6439d09e53081 height=548521 date=2018-11-03T01:39:02Z progress=0.989162 2018-11-21T18:03:50Z init message: Rewinding blocks... 2018-11-21T18:04:22Z init message: Verifying blocks... 2018-11-21T18:04:22Z Verifying last 6 blocks at level 3 2018-11-21T18:04:22Z [0%]...[16%]...ThreadRPCServer method=stop user=deploy 2018-11-21T18:17:13Z block index 889465ms 2018-11-21T18:17:13Z Shutdown requested. Exiting. 2018-11-21T18:17:14Z Interrupting HTTP RPC server 2018-11-21T18:17:14Z Interrupting RPC 2018-11-21T18:17:14Z Shutdown: In progress... 2018-11-21T18:17:15Z Stopping HTTP RPC server 2018-11-21T18:17:15Z Stopping RPC 2018-11-21T18:17:15Z RPC stopped. 2018-11-21T18:17:16Z scheduler thread interrupt 2018-11-21T18:17:19Z Shutdown: done 
submitted by rraallvv to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

txindex=1 server=1 question (node, rpc) (x-post from /r/Bitcoin)

submitted by ASICmachine to CryptoCurrencyClassic [link] [comments]

Sending RPC commands to Bitcoin Client

I'm trying like hell to learn java, and with some success. However, I want to learn how to connect to my bitcoin rpc server and send commands, such as getinfo or sendfrom.
I understand that functions are called methods in java, so I'd like a method to actually initiate the connection and verify that it works by sending a getinfo command, then when it returns something that isn't null, have the ability to send other commands.
I know there are java classes and stuff that people have already written, but I want to write it for myself and understand better how it works and what is required.
I have experience with several different programming languages and part of my job is to write custom modules for our ERP system, which uses some stupid mashup of cobol and VB. So, any help would be greatly appreciated!!! Thanks!
submitted by bmp02050 to learnjava [link] [comments]

The Bitcoin + Lightning ⚡ node workshop at the Tel Aviv Bitcoin Embassy is complete! The first round graduated 12 new full node owners with a setup that includes Tor, Bitcoin Core, C-lightning, Electrum Personal Server, Spark Lightning Wallet and btc-rpc-explorer.

The Bitcoin + Lightning ⚡ node workshop at the Tel Aviv Bitcoin Embassy is complete! The first round graduated 12 new full node owners with a setup that includes Tor, Bitcoin Core, C-lightning, Electrum Personal Server, Spark Lightning Wallet and btc-rpc-explorer. submitted by shesek1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why is does it take so long to shut down an node used only as a JSON-RPC server? /r/Bitcoin

Why is does it take so long to shut down an node used only as a JSON-RPC server? /Bitcoin submitted by cryptoallbot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Why is does it take so long to shut down an node used only as a JSON-RPC server? /r/Bitcoin

Why is does it take so long to shut down an node used only as a JSON-RPC server? /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

iguana is bitcoin core, client, RPC server and more

iguana is bitcoin core, client, RPC server and more submitted by grewalsatinder to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Setting up a local bitcoin core server for json-rpc calls (testnet)?

Setting up a local bitcoin core server for json-rpc calls (testnet)? submitted by arcral to AlternativeCoin [link] [comments]

Setting up a local bitcoin core server for json-rpc calls (testnet)? /r/Bitcoin

Setting up a local bitcoin core server for json-rpc calls (testnet)? /Bitcoin submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

I was frustrated at how hard it is to setup for dev around (not on) Bitcoin Core so put this together. It includes Bitcoin Core via PPA and Rein's client and server under virtualenv. A highlight is Bitcoin Core being configured use testnet, 2gb pruned, serving RPC with a randomly generated password.

I was frustrated at how hard it is to setup for dev around (not on) Bitcoin Core so put this together. It includes Bitcoin Core via PPA and Rein's client and server under virtualenv. A highlight is Bitcoin Core being configured use testnet, 2gb pruned, serving RPC with a randomly generated password. submitted by dsterry to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

iguana is bitcoin core, client, RPC server and more

iguana is bitcoin core, client, RPC server and more submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

New Multi-coin RPC server, bitcoins and all other coins too

New Multi-coin RPC server, bitcoins and all other coins too submitted by hakarb to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Tutorial: Using Bitcoin-QT as a JSON RPC Server (C# sample but could be used with any language)

submitted by 100acrewood to BitcoinCode [link] [comments]

Are there any Bitcoin clients that can RPC connect to a Bitcoind server?

I'm running the original Bitcoin wallet on my server, and I wanted a graphical client that I can run on my desktop that can rpc connect to my server, but I can't seem to find any.
The Bitcoin-qt doesn't support rpcconnect (https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/pull/2513 which is very strange! it should support it :().
Does anyone know of any client that does support it?
submitted by intahnetmonster to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Algorithm for starting to accept payments in BTC?

I'm a developer and run a full node of Bitcoin.
I have several shops where I plan to start accepting bitcoin payments. The volume I invision in the beginning would be rather small.
(1) What'd be a simple algorithm for how to get started with it?
Would I have to generate (N of shops * 100) addresses first? And then map each of 100 to a shop? And then at checkout give a user one of those addresses and then watch when the 1st confirmation arrives, by doing poll requests from my shop to my full node server, remotely, via RPC?

(2) Also, how would I actually properly create a wallet for this? I'll need that wallet to be watch-only.
(3) Would I be able to somehow connect my Electrum client-wallet to that bitcoin watch-only wallet so that I could see how much of bitcoins there're in it, from my laptop in a more convenient manner?

---
I don't consider third-party solutions such as BTC server or Electrum server. I use Electrum as a wallet only, on desktop.
submitted by artjuna_0900 to btc [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.
ColdCard also has a utility called ckcc that will do the sign operation instead of HWI, but in many ways they are interchangeable. KeepKey and Ledger both have libraries for scripted signing but no one-shot, one-line console apps that I know of. But HWI and Electrum of course work on all four.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Easiest way to run a full node that you can make RPCs to?

I want to run a bitcoin full node server that I can make remote procedure calls (RPCs) to. I also cannot use a pruned node. Does anyone have any idea how to go about setting this up cheaply?
- My first thought was to use a virtual private server (from DigitalOcean or a similar provider). That way I would have a static IP address I could use to make RPCs. The problem is, now that a full node requires hundreds of gigabytes of storage, this is super expensive.
- My next thought was to run a server on my own hardware, but my internet connection isn't for running servers on and I don't have access to a static IP address. Is it possible to somehow hire a cheap VPS and route requests (through SSH or something similar) to a raspberry pi full node at a residential address?
I think I might be missing something. Is there a typical way to go about this? Any ideas would be appreciated.
submitted by stableascent to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How can I know that a full node has finished syncronization?

How can I know that a full Bitcoin (BTC) node, that I run on my server, has finished the initial syncronization? Is there a special RPC API call that'd return "true"?
submitted by artjuna_0900 to btc [link] [comments]

txindex=1 server=1 question (node, rpc)

Edit: solved! Just needed to wait for indexing to catch up
Hi all I'm trying to use btc-rpc-explorer
https://github.com/janoside/btc-rpc-explorer
I have a full node via bitcoin qt. Can I use qt for block explorer?
I launch block explorer and I'm getting rpc error. The webpage states "check rpc connection info"
The github project states I need server=1 and txindex=1. Can I make qt run with these settings? I tried adding them to the .conf but how can I confirm qt is running with these options, in console somehow?
In case I can't use qt for this I downloaded bitcoind. It looks like I can start the daemon with txindex=1 and server=1 but still getting same connection problem with btc-rpc-explorer.
Do I have to do -reindex=1? Can I do that within qt? If not and I use bitcoin cli will it disrupt qt in any way?
Thanks
Edit: this is on Ubuntu
submitted by redditor157b to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to TREZOR [link] [comments]

Raspibolt troubles: bitcoind shutting down, out of space?

Hey y'all. Had my node running for some 19-20 months now. Following the Stadicus guide. on a raspberry pi 3. Bitcoin v0.19.0.1
the other day I just checked up on it and noticed it was in a failed state and didn't have the HDD mounted. The log seems to indicate it just stopped, the last entry is
2020-08-21T17:35:41Z socket recv error Connection reset by peer (104) 
I did the troubleshooting guide (no stranger to this) figuring there had been a power outage possibly. I ran fsck and it took a LONG while to find and clean up a lot of errors. The drive works fine, i can connect to it via my pc (using linux file systems paragon) transfer files.. etc. I ran fsck another time or two to be sure and no errors found. It's got 57% free space.
I got the raspberry pi to mount the HDD again, started up bitcoind and it started to sync slowly. I'd check with getblockchain info and figured it would take around 60+ hours to finish and left it overnight.
Today I come back to find it was no longer syncing. Now no matter what I do, starting bitcoind manually, or having it automatically boot getblockchain info gives me an error
error: Could not connect to the server 127.0.0.1:8332 Make sure the bitcoind server is running and that you are connecting to the correct RPC port. 
So bitcoind seems to shutdown instantly after starting it. AND checking the log, the last message from the 21st (above) is all that's there, no new information in the log.
I tried to re-install bitcoin v0.19.0.1 and got a suspect. When extracting the package into the tmp folder, it fails due to out of space errors. So this possibly means something is going on with the SD card? or something filled it up? Not sure what to check, or how really.
curiously the startup script for the raspibolt displays this for the SSD. Not sure how to interpret that. 36M free?
 SSD 36M (240%) 
here i'm stuck, what can I try next? I believe I have backups of the important information. I'd like to avoid a total reformatting if at all possible.
submitted by mabezard to lightningnetwork [link] [comments]

Bitcoin RPC Remote Code Execution Exploit for BitcoinCore 0.9-0.15.1 CVE-2017-9230 Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 1 How to give your bitcoin node commands using a web server

$ ./bitcoind -daemon bitcoin server starting $ ./bitcoin-cli -rpcwait help # shows the help text A list of RPC calls will be shown. $ ./bitcoin-cli getbalance 2000.00000 If you are learning the API, it is a very good idea to use the test network (run bitcoind -testnet and bitcoin-cli -testnet). JSON-RPC. Running Bitcoin with the -server argument (or running bitcoind) tells it to function as a ... Using any computer, go to the Bitcoin Core download page and verify you have made a secure connection to the server. In the “Linux (tgz)” section of the Download page, choose the appropriate file for your Linux install (either 32-bit or 64-bit) and download the file. If necessary, move the file to the computer you want to use to run Bitcoin ... get multiple Cash Accounts block height and inclusion proof for independent verification Mögliche Duplikate: Wie sicher sind die DNS-Server für Bitcoin? In der früheren version von Bitcoin IRC-Kanal wurde verwendet, um die ersten Samen von den Gleichaltrigen und als version 0.6 es wurde weitgehend ersetzt durch den DNS-Servern. Ist dieser Ansatz machen Bitcoin sicherer, und wenn ja, in welcher Weise? ... glbse height. 15.03.2012, 17:21:07. 41. Die Verknüpfung einer Transaktion ... Accordingly, the only thing you need to accept bitcoins is a bitcoin client on the server. It is called bitcoind, it’s just a console version of the client, with all the same familiar functionality. It works through the JSON-RPC protocol, is located under port 8332. All that remains after installation is to set up the client and Node.js. Install Bitcoind . To install, you will need to run ...

[index] [32617] [33622] [35314] [3409] [26399] [8262] [5999] [50828] [8761] [41398]

Bitcoin RPC Remote Code Execution Exploit for BitcoinCore 0.9-0.15.1 CVE-2017-9230

Skip navigation Sign in. Search Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 3 - bitcoin.conf - Duration: 8:10. ... How to build a monero full (remote) node on ubuntu linux server - Duration: 14:32. monero.berlin 663 views. 14:32. Hijacking ... In this video I revisit an old topic where several things have changed since 2015 in regards to using the JSON-RPC to communicate with your node with an apache server with PHP. https://www.amazon ... RPC and Client Server Systems - Georgia Tech - Advanced Operating Systems - Duration: 3 ... Bitcoin JSON-RPC Tutorial 3 - bitcoin.conf - Duration: 8:10. m1xolyd1an 13,342 views. 8:10 . Web ...

#