Mixify - Bitcoin Mixer PHP Script by CorentinLB Codester

Simple Bitcoin Mixer - no registration needed, no javascript used ideal with TOR Browser + No Script

submitted by btcmixme to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions. Privacy-o-meter is the first step to defend yourself against heuristics blockchain surveillance companies use.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions. Privacy-o-meter is the first step to defend yourself against heuristics blockchain surveillance companies use.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

After 3.5years ive found my 100x Chimera $cmra The real $ghost

Market cap circa 100k
High risk play
What is Chimera?
Chimera is an ERC-20 token (Ethereum) that aims to remove the transparency seen in typical Ethereum tokens. The pros and cons for transparency vary from person to person, with some people preferring an asset such as Monero over something like Bitcoin. Chimera is essentially Ethereum's solution to creating an anonymous service on Ethereum's blockchain. Thus, Chimera can be thought of a "private version of Ethereum" - Chimera holds all the capabilities as Ethereum with reduced transparency. Since the development team plans to have Chimera be used as a payment method, it can be seen as a currency.
Why buy Chimera?
Anyone who is interested in escaping the transparency of the blockchain would benefit from Chimera's technology. Whether you are looking to hide large amounts of funds or to simply stay anonymous, using Chimera's services leaves no paper trails, thus giving benefit to those seeking sanction from taxing authorities (although our team does not endorse this). Chimera tokens can also be used as a form of payment towards services our team will offer in the future.
What will Chimera offer to holders?
Chimera holders benefit by not being listed under the token contract address when searched on current block explorers. The transactions themselves can only be viewed in raw hexadecimal form and need to be sought out and converted to get the values of transaction functions. This information (commonly displayed for ERC-20 tokens) has been hidden by our token, preventing services such as WhaleWatcher.io from being able to scan the blockchain for large transactions and thus prevents them from posting the information on social media sites. For large coin holders, whale watching services can be trouble. Chimera and its services aim to surpass this hurdle.
What incentives does Chimera give?
Chimera can be viewed as a private form of Ethereum. It contains all the core functionalities of the Ethereum token and removes the associated transparency. Using Chimera as a currency provides incentives such as secure and anonymous transfers, a store of value over time, and early access to the products and services the Chimera team will be offering.
How is this different than any other ERC-20 token?
Chimera differs from most ERC-20 tokens in the sense that the token contract will not display the holders or quantities. This means that making a script/tool to collect the information of token holders is much harder to achieve than regular ERC-20 tokens. When Chimera is sent through the Scrambler service, it creates a chain of transactions effectively making the time complexity of a script of software exponential rather than linear. The only "easy to see" transactions are from the initial contract creation, minting, and burning.
But wait - can't we still technically see transactions if we look hard enough?
While block explorers such as Etherscan typically have trouble displaying the "To" address and amount with our token, it is not completely impossible to trace transactions. While users take part in Chimera's Scrambler, the difficulty of tracing the recipients grows exponentially. As more "middle wallets" are added, the complexity becomes even stronger.
What's in store for the future?
As of now, the Chimera team has their first main net service working at https://chimera.exchange/scrambler. This service allows you to further conceal a transfer of funds. Future projects include a crypto-based subscription website for content and media creators. Customers will be able to pay in Chimera as well as other major crypto assets to unlock media hosted by a creator, essentially creating the most anonymous subscription space to host your photos and videos. Make sure to check out our News webpage and Twitter for updates!
Exchange:
Uniswap v1 https://v1.uniswap.exchange/swap
Contract: 0x37737ad7e32ed440c312910cfc4a2e4d52867caf
100m total supply. Circ supply is 4.5m
https://chimera.exchange/statistics/circulating
Useful links
https://www.coingecko.com/en/coins/chimera
https://etherscan.io/
token/0x37737ad7e
32ed440c312910cfc4a2e4d52867caf
https://twitter.com/ChimeraToken
https://forkdelta.app/#!/trade/0x37737ad7e32ed440c312910cfc4a2e4d52867caf-ETH
https://chimera.exchange
Newly incorporated and are now Chimera Digital, Inc based out of Ontario, Canada. See official documentation:
Primary focus right now is to finish the last of the security tests for the wallet scramblemixer (now being called Scram!) and a major website redesign. Once they are up and running, they will aggressively apply to dexes to gain as much organic notoriety and liquidity as possible without having to take on any large investors.
Whitepaper is being fully reworked atm.
LinkedIn profiles for some of team: Lead Developer Alex can be found here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alex-schwarz-94248269/ and here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christina-tarpley-b1baa792/
If you look at etherscan you will see the tech working. It will show no transfers. However compare this with uniswap transactions and you will see the real movement.
Nice tweet by a good team:
https://twitter.com/binanceaudit/status/1266934471674277889?s=19
Federal Corporation Information - 1207567-9 - Online Filing Centre - Corporations Canada - Corporations - Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/sccc/CorporationsCanada/fdrlCrpDtls.html?corpId=12075679&V_TOKEN=1591294452581&crpNm=&crpNmbr=1207567-9&bsNmbr=
Key points to note:
  1. Mixer tech on ether network.
  2. Etherscan can not track real movements due to this. Uniswap info will show transactions though.
  3. Team is only a few months old
  4. Whitepaper is being redesigned.
  5. Website is being redesigned
  6. 100k market cap should be looked at as an idea and researched further with their team
  7. Incorporation documents above are legitimate.
https://discord.gg/MM4fGx
submitted by therealfacemelter to CryptoMoonShots [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to WasabiWallet [link] [comments]

Epic Cash AMA Recap with CryptoDiffer Community

CryptoDiffer team Hello, everyone! We are glad to meet here: Max Freeman (@maxfreeman4), Project Lead at Epic Cash Yoga Dude (@Yogadude), PR&Marketing at Epic Cash Xenolink (@Xenolink), Advisor at Epic Cash
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash Thanks Max, we are excited to be here!
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash Hello Everyone! Thank you for having us here!
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash Thank you to the CryptoDiffer team and CryptoDiffer community for hosting us!
CryptoDiffer team Let`s start from the first introduction question: Q1: Can you introduce yourself to the community? What is your background and how did you join Epic Cash?
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash
Hello! My background is Marketing and Business Development, I’ve been in crypto since 2011 started with Bitcoin, then Monero in 2014, Ethereum in 2015 and at some point Doge for fun and profit. I joined Epic Cash team in September 2019 handling PR and Marketing.
I saw in Epic Cash what was missing in my previous cryptos — things that were missing in Bitcoin and Monero especially.
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
Hello Cryptodiffer Community, I am not an original co-founder nor am I a developer for the Epic Cash project. I am however a community member that is involved in helping scale this project to higher levels. One of the many beauties of Epic Cash is that every single member in the community has the opportunity to be part of EPIC’s team, it can be from development all the way to content producing. Epic Cash is a community driven project. The true Core Team of Epic Cash is our community. I believe a community that is the Core Team is truly powerful. EPIC Cash has one of the freshest and strongest communities I have seen in quite a while. Which is one of the reasons why I became involved in this project. Epic displayed some of the most self community produced content I have seen in a project. I’m actually a doctor of medicine but in terms of my experience in crypto, I have been involved in the industry since 2012 beginning with mining Litecoin. Since then I have been doing deep dive analysis on different projects, investing, and building a network in crypto that I will utilize to help connect and scale Epic in every way I can. To give some credit to those people in my network that have been a part of helping give Epic exposure, I would like to give a special thanks to u/Tetsugan and u/Saurabhblr. Tetsugan has been doing a lot of work for the Japanese community to penetrate the Japanese market, and Japan has already developed a growing interest in Epic. Daku Sarabh the owner and creator of Crypto Daku Robinhooders, I would like to thank him and his community for giving us one of our first large AMA’s, which he has supported our project early and given us a free AMA. Many more to thank but can’t be disclosed. Also thank you to all the Epic Community leaders, developers, and Content producers!
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
I’m Max Freeman, which stands for “Maximum Freedom for Mankind”. I started working on the ideas that would become Epic in 2018. I fell in love with Bitcoin in 2017 but realized that it needs privacy at the base layer, fungibility, better scalability in order to go to the next level.
CryptoDiffer team
Really interesting backgrounds I must admit, pleasure to see the team that clearly has one vision of the project by being completely decentralized:)
Q2: Can you briefly describe what is Epic Cash in 3–5 sentences? What technology stands behind Epic Cash and why it’s better than the existing one?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
I’d like to highlight the differences between Epic and the two highest-valued privacy coin projects, Monero and Zcash. XMR has always-on privacy like Epic does, but at a cost: Its blockchain is over 20x more data intensive than Epic, which limits its possibilities for scalability. Epic’s blockchain is small and light enough to run a full node on cell phones, something that is in our product road map. ZEC by comparison can’t run on low end devices because of its zero knowledge based approach, and only 1% of transactions are fully private. Epic is simply newer, more advanced technology than prior networks thanks to Mimblewimble
We will also add more algorithms to widen the range of hardware that can participate in mining. For example, cell phones and tablets based around ARM chips. Millions of people can mine Epic that can’t mine Bitcoin, and that will help grow the network rapidly.
There are some great short videos on our YouTube channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQBFfksJlM97rgrplLRwNUg/videos
that explain why we believe we have created something truly special here.
Our core architecture derives from Grin, so we are fortunate to benefit on an ongoing basis from their considerable development efforts. We are focused on making our currency truly usable and widely available, beyond a store of value and becoming a true medium of exchange.
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash
Well we all have our views, but in a nutshell, we offer things that were missing in the previous cryptos. We have sound fiscal emission schedule matching Bitcoin, but we are vastly more private and faster. Our blockchain is lighter than Bitcoin or Monero and our tech is more scalable. Also, we are unique in that we are mineable with CPUs and GPUs as well as ASICs, giving the broadest population the ability to mine Epic Cash. Plus, you can’t forget FUNGIBILITY 🙂 we are big on that — since you can’t have true privacy without fungibility.
Also, please understand, we have HUGE respect to all the cryptos that came before us, we learned a lot from them, and thanks to their mistakes we evolved.
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
To add on, what also makes Epic Cash unique is the ability to decentralize the mining using a tri-algo model of Random X (CPU), Progpow (GPU), and Cuckoo (ASIC) for an ability to do hybrid mining. I believe this is an issue we can see today in Bitcoin having centralized mining and the average user has a costly barrier of entry.
To follow up on this one in my opinion one of the things we adopted that we have seen success for , in example Bitcoin and Monero, is a strong community driven coin. I believe having a community driven coin will provide a more organic atmosphere especially when starting with No ICO, or Premine with a fair distribution model for everyone.
CryptoDiffer team
Q3: What are the major milestones Epic Cash has achieved so far? Maybe you can share with us some exciting plans for future weeks/months?
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash
Since we went live in September of 2019, we attracted a very large community of users, miners, investors and contributors from across the world. Epic Cash is a very international project with white papers translated into over 30 languages. We are very much a community driven project; this is very evident from our content and the amount of translations in our white papers and in our social media content.
We are constantly working on improving our usability, security and privacy, as well as getting our message and philosophy out into the world to achieve mass adoption. We have a lot of exciting plans for our project, the plan is to make Epic Cash into something that is More than Money.
You can tell I am the Marketing guy since my message is less about the actual tech and more about the usability and use cases for Epic Cash, I think our Team and Community have a great mix of technical, practical, social and fiscal experiences. Since we opened our YouTube channels content for community submissions, we have seen our content translated into Spanish, French, German, Polish, Chinese, Japanese, Arabic, Russian, and other languages
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
Our future development roadmap will be published soon and includes 4 tracks:
Usability
Mining
Core Protocol
Ecosystem Development
Core Protocol
Epic Server 2.9.0 — this release improves the difficulty adjustment and is aimed at making block emission closer to the target 60 seconds, particularly reducing the incidence of extremely short and long blocks — Status: In Development (Testing) Anticipated Release: June 2020
Epic Server 3.0.0 — this completes the rebase to Grin 3.0.0 and serves as the prerequisite to some important functional building blocks for the future of the ecosystem. Specifically, sending via Tor (which eliminates the need to open ports), proof of payment (useful for certain dex applications e.g. Bisq), and our native mobile app. Status: In Development (Testing) Anticipated Release: Fall 2020
Non-Interactive Transactions — this will enhance usability by enabling “fire and forget” send-to-address functionality that users are accustomed to from most cryptocurrencies. Status: Drawing Board Anticipated Release: n/a
Scaling Options — when blocks start becoming full, how will we increase capacity? Two obvious options are increasing the block size, as well as a Lightning Network-style Layer 2 structure. Status: Drawing Board Anticipated Release: n/a
Confidential Assets — Similar to Raven, Tari, and Beam, the ability to create independently tradable assets that ride on the Epic Blockchain. Status: Drawing Board Anticipated Release: n/a
Usability
GUI Wallet 2.0 — Restore from seed words and various usability enhancements — Status: Needs Assessment Anticipated Release: Fall 2020
Mobile App — Native mobile experience for iOS and Android. Status: In Development (Testing) Anticipated Release: Winter 2020
Telegram Integration — Anonymous payments over the Telegram network, bot functionality for groups. Status: Drawing Board Anticipated Release: n/a
Mining
RandomX on ARM — Our 4th PoW algorithm, this will enable tablets, cell phones, and low power devices such as Raspberry Pi to participate in mining. Status: Needs Assessment Anticipated Release: n/a
The economics of mining Epic are extremely compelling for countries that have free or extremely cheap electricity, since anyone with an ordinary PC can mine. Individual people around the world can simply run the miner and earn meaningful money (imagine Venezuela for example), something that has not been possible since the very early days of Bitcoin.
Ecosystem Development
Atomic Swaps — Connecting Epic to other blockchains in a trustless way, starting with ETH so that Epic can trade on DeFi infrastructure such as Uniswap, Kyber, etc. Status: Drawing Board Anticipated Release: n/a
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
From the Community aspect, we have been further developing our community international reach. We have been seeing an increase in interest from South America, China, Russia, Japan, Italy, and the Philippines. We are working on targeting more countries. We truly aim to be a decentralized project that is open to everyone worldwide.
CryptoDiffer team
Great, thank you for your answers, we now can move to community questions part!
Cryptodiffer Community
You have 3 mining algorithms, the question is: how do they not compete with each other? Is there any benefit of mining on the GPU and CPU if someone is mining on the ASIC?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
The block selection is deterministic, so that every 100 blocks, 60% are for RandomX (CPU), 38% for ProgPow (GPU), and 2% for Cuckoo (ASIC) — the policy is flexible so that we can have as many algorithms with any percentages we want. The goal is to make the most decentralized and resilient network possible, and with that in mind we are excited to work on enabling tablets and cell phones to mine, since that opens it up to millions of people that otherwise can’t take part.
Cryptodiffer Community
To Run a project smoothly, Funding is very important, From where does the Funding/revenue come from?
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
Yes, early on this was realized and in order to scale a project funds are indeed needed. Epic Cash did not start with any funding and no ICO and was organically genesis mined with no pre-mine. Epic cash is also a nonprofit community driven project similar to Monero. There is no profit-driven entity in the picture. To overcome the revenue issue Epic Cash setup a development fund tax that decreases 1% every year until 2028 when Epic Cash reaches singularity with Bitcoin emissions. Currently it is at 7.77%. This will help support the scaling of the project.
Cryptodiffer Community
Hi! In your experience working also with MONERO can you please clarify which are those identified problems that EPIC CASH aims to develop and resolve? What’s the main advantage that EPIC CASH has over MONERO? Thank you!
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash
First, I must admit that I am still a huge fan and HODLer of Monero. That said:
✅ our blockchain is MUCH lighter than Monero’s
✅ our transaction processing speed is much faster
✅ our address-less blockchain is more private
✅ Epic Cash can be mined with CPU (RandomX) GPU (ProgPow) and Cuckoo, whereas Monero migrated to RandomX and currently only mineable with CPU
Cryptodiffer Community
  1. the feature ‘Cut Through’ deletes old data, how is it decided which data will be deletes, and what are the consequences of it for the platform and therefore the users?
  2. On your website I see links to download Epic wallet and mining software for Linux,Windows and MacOs, I am a user of android, is there a version for me, or does it have a release date?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
  1. This is one of the most exciting features of Mimblewimble, which is its extraordinary ability to compress blockchain data. In Bitcoin, the entire history of a coin must be replayed every time it is spent, and comprehensive details are permanently stored in the blockchain. Epic discards spent transaction inputs and consolidates outputs, storing neither addresses or amounts, only a tiny kernel to allow sender and receiver to prove their transaction.
  2. The Vitex mobile app is great for today, and we have a native mobile app for iOS and Android in the works as well.
Cryptodiffer Community
$EPIC Have total Supply of 21,000,000 EPIC , is there any burning plan? Or Buyback program to maintain $EPIC price in the future?
Who is Epic Biggest competitors?
And what’s makes epic better than competitors?
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
We respect the older generation coins like Bitcoin. But we have learned that the supply economics of Bitcoin is very sound. Until today we can witness how the Bitcoin is being adopted institutionally and by retail. We match the 21 million BTC supply economics because it is an inelastic fixed model which makes the long-term economics very sound. To have an elastic model of burning tokens or printing tokens will not have a solid economic future. Take for example the USD which is an inflating supply. In terms of competitors we look at everyone in crypto with respect and also learn from everyone. If we had to compare to other Mimblewimble tech coins, Grin is an inelastic forever inflating supply which in the long term is not sound economics. Beam however is an inelastic model but is formed as a corporation. The fair distribution is not there because of the permanent revenue model setup for them. Epic Cash a non-profit development tax fund model for scaling purposes that will disappear by 2028’s singularity.
Cryptodiffer Community
What your plans in place for global expansion, are you focusing on only market at this time? Or focus on building and developing or getting customers and users, or partnerships?
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash
Since we are a community project, we have many developers, in addition to the core team.
Our plans for Global expansion are simple — we have advocates in different regions addressing their audiences in their native languages. We are growing organically, by explaining our ideology and usability. The idea is to grow beyond needing a fiat bridge for crypto use, but to rather replace fiat with our borderless, private and fungible crypto so people can use it to get goods and services without using banks.
We are not limiting ourselves to one particular demographic — Epic Cash is a valid solution for the gamers, investors, techie and non techie people, and the unbanked.
Cryptodiffer Community
EPIC confidential coin! Did you have any problems with the regulators? And there will be no problems with listing on centralized exchanges?
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
In terms of structure, we are carefully set up to minimize these concerns. Without a company or investors in the picture, and having raised no funds, there is little scope to attack in terms of securities laws. Bitcoin and Ethereum are widely acknowledged as acceptable, and we follow in their well-established footprints in that respect. Centralized exchanges already trade other privacy coins, so we don’t see this as much of an issue either. In general, decentralized p2p exchange options are more interesting than today’s centralized platforms. They are more censorship resistant, secure, and privacy-protecting. As the technology gets better, they should continue to gain market share and that’s why we’re proud to be partnered with Vitex, whose exchange and mobile app work very well.
Cryptodiffer Community
What are the main utility and real-life usage of the #EPIC As an investor, why should we invest in the #EPIC project as a long-term investment?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
Because our blockchain is so light (only 1.16gb currently, and grows very slowly) it is naturally well suited to become a decentralized mobile money standard because people can run a full node on their phone, guaranteeing the security of their funds. Scalability in Bitcoin requires complicated and compromised workarounds such as Lightning Network and light clients, and these problems are solved in Epic.
With our forthcoming Mobile Mining app, hundreds of millions of cell phones and tablets will be able to easily join the network. People can quickly and cheaply send money to one another, fulfilling the long-envisioned promise of P2P electronic cash.
As an investor, it’s important to ask a few key questions. Bitcoin Standard tokenomics of disinflation and a fixed supply are well proven over a decade now. We follow this model exactly, with a permanently synchronized supply from 2028, and 4 emission halvings from now until then, with our first one in about two weeks. Beyond that, we can apply some simple logical tests. What is more valuable, money that can only be used in some cases (censorable Bitcoin based on a lack of fungibility) or money that can be used universally? (fungible Epic based on always-on privacy by default). Epic is also poised to be a more decentralized and therefore resilient network because of wider participation in mining. Epic is designed to be Bitcoin++ Privacy, Fungibility, Scalability
Cryptodiffer Community
Q1. What are advantages for choosing three mining algorithms RandomX+, ProgPow and CuckAToo31+ ?
Q2. Beam and Grin use MimbleWimble protocol, so what are difference for Epic? All of you will be friends for partners or competitors?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
RandomX and ProgPow are designed to use the entirety of a CPU / GPU’s unique processing capabilities in a way that other types of hardware don’t work as well. You can run RandomX on a GPU but it doesn’t work nearly as well as a much cheaper CPU, for example. Cuckoo is a “memory hard” algorithm that widens the range of companies that can produce the hardware.
Grin and Beam are great projects and we’ve learned a lot from them. We inherited our first codebase from Grin’s excellent Rust design, which is a better language for community participation than C++ that Beam currently uses.
Functionally, Mimblewimble is similar across the 3 coins, with standard Confidential Transactions, CoinJoin, Dandelion++, Schnorr Signatures and other advanced features. Grin is primarily ASIC-targeted, Beam is GPU-targeted, and Epic is multi-hardware.
The biggest differences though are in tokenomics and project structure. Grin has permanent inflation of 60 coins per block with no halvings, which means steady erosion of value over time due to new supply pressure. It also lacks a steady funding model, making future development in jeopardy, particularly as the per coin price falls. Beam has a for-profit model with heavy early inflation and a high developer tax. Epic builds on the strengths of these earlier mimblewimble projects and addresses the parts that could be improved.
Cryptodiffer Community Some privacy coin has scalability issues! How Epic cash will solve scalability issues? Why you choose randomX consensus algorithem?
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
Fungibility means that you can’t distinguish one unit of currency from another, in example Gold. Fungibility has recently become a hot issue as people have been noticing Bitcoins being locked up by exchanges which may of had a nefarious history which are called Tainted Coins. In example coins that have been involved in a hack, darknet market transactions, or even processing coin through a mixer. Today we can already see freshly mined Bitcoins being sold at a premium price to avoid the fungibility problem Bitcoin carries today. Bitcoin can be tracked by chainalysis and is not a fungible cryptocurrency. One of the features that Epic has is privacy with added fungibility, because of Mimblewimble technology, Epic has no addresses recorded and therefore nothing can be tracked by chainalysis. Below I provide a link of an example of what the lack of fungibility is resulting in today with Bitcoin. One of the reasons why we chose the Random X algo. is because of the easy barrier of entry and also to further decentralize the mining. Random X algo can be mined on old computers or laptops. We also have 2 other algos Progpow (GPU), and Cuckoo (ASIC) to create a wider decentralization of mining methods for Epic.
Cryptodiffer Community
I’m a newbie in crypto and blockchain so how will Epic Cash team target and educate people who don’t know about blockchain and crypto?
What is the uniqueness of Epic Cash that cannot be found in other project that´s been released so far ?
Yoga Dude Pr&Marketing at Epic Cash
Actually, while we have our white paper translated into over 30 languages, we are more focused on explaining our uses and advantages rather than cold specs. Our tech is solid, but we not get hung up on pure tech talk which most casual users do not need to or care to understand. As long as our fundamentals and tech are secure and user friendly our primary goal is to educate about use cases and market potential.
The uniqueness of Epic Cash is its amalgamation of “whats good” in other cryptos. We use Mimblewimble for privacy and anonymity. Our blockchain is much lighter than our competitors. We are the only Mimblewimble crypto to use a unique cocktail of mining algorithms allowing to be mined by casual miners with gaming rigs and laptops, while remaining friendly to GPU and CPU farmers.
The “uniqueness” is learning from the mistakes of those who came before us, we evolved and learned, which is why our privacy is better, we are faster, we are fungible, we offer diverse mining and so on. We are the best blend — thats powerful and unique
Cryptodiffer Community
Can you share EPIC’s vision for decentralized finance (DEFI)? What features do EPIC have to support DEFI?
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash
We view Epic as ideally suited to be the decentralized digital reserve asset of the new Private Internet of Money that’s emerging. At a technology level, atomic swaps can be created to build liquidity bridges so that wrapped Epic tokens (like WBTC, WETH) can trade on other networks as ERC20, BEP2, NEP5, VIP180, Algorand and so on. There is more Bitcoin value locked on Ethereum than in Lightning Network, so we will similarly integrate Epic so that it can trade on networks such as Uniswap, Kyber, and so on.
Longer term, if there is market demand for it, thanks to Scriptless Script functionality our blockchain has, we can build “Confidential Assets” (which Raven, Tari, and Beam are all also working on) that enable people to create tokenized assets in a private way.
Cryptodiffer Community
If you could choose one celebrity to promote Epic-cash, who that would be?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
I am a firm believer that the strength of the project lies in allowing community members to become their own celebrities, if their content is good enough the community will propel them to celebrity status. Organic celebrities with small but loyal following are vastly more beneficial than big name professional shills with inflated but non caring audiences.
I remember the early days of Apple when an enthusiastic dude named Guy Kawasaki became Apple Evangelist, he was literally going around stores that sold Apple and visited user groups and Evangelized his belief in Apple. This guy became a Legend and helped Apple become what it is today.
Epic Cash will have its OWN Celebrities
Cryptodiffer Community
How does $EPIC solve scalability of transactions? Current blockchains face issues with scalability a lot, how does $EPIC creates a solution to it?
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
Epic Cash is utilizing Mimblewimble technology. Besides the privacy & fungibility aspect of the tech. There is the scalability features of it. It is implemented into Epic by transaction cut-through. Which means it allows nodes to remove all intermediate transactions, thus significantly reducing the blockchain size without affecting its validation. Mimblewimble also does not use addresses like a BTC address, and amount of transactions are also not recorded. One problem Monero and Bitcoin are facing now is scalability. It is evident today that data is getting more expensive and that will be a problem in the long run for those coins. Epic is 90% lighter and more scalable compared to Monero and Bitcoin.
Cryptodiffer Community
what are the ways that Epic Cash generates profits/revenue to maintain your project and what is its revenue model ? How can it make benefit win-win to both invester and your project ?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
There is a block subsidy of 7.77% that declines 1.11% per year until 0, where it stays after that. As a nonprofit community effort, this extremely modest amount goes much further than in other projects, which often take 20, 30, even 50+ % of the coin supply. We believe that this ongoing funding model best aligns the long term incentives for all participants and balances the compromises between the ends of the centralized/decentralized spectrum of choices that any project must make.
Cryptodiffer Community
Q1 : What are your major goals to archive in the next 3–4 years?
Q2 : What are your plans to expand and gain more adoption?
Yoga Dude Pr&Marketing at Epic Cash
Max already talked about our technical plans and goals in his roadmap. Allow me to talk more about the non technical 😁
We are aiming for broader reach in the non technical more mainstream community — this is a big challenge but we believe it is doable. By offering simpler ways to mine Epic Cash (with smart phones for example), and by doing more education we will achieve the holy grail of crypto — moving past the fiat bridges and getting Epic Cash to be accepted as means of payment for goods and services. We will accomplish this by working with regional advocacy groups, community interaction, off-line promotional activities and diverse social media targeting.
Cryptodiffer Community
It seems to me that EpicCash will have its first Halving, right? Why a halving so soon?
Is a mobile version feasible?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
Our supply emission catches up to that of Bitcoin’s first 19 years after 8 years in Epic, so that requires more frequent halvings. Today’s block emission is 16, next up are 8, 4, 2, and then finally 0.15625. After that, the supply of Epic and that of BTC stay synchronized until maxing out at 21m coins in 2140.
Today we have a mobile wallet through the Vitex app, a native mobile wallet coming, and are working on mobile mining.
Cryptodiffer Community
What markets will you add after that?
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash
Well, we are aiming to have ALL markets
Epic Cash in its final iteration will be usable by everyone everywhere regardless of their technical expertise. We are not limiting ourselves to the technocrats, one of our main goals is to help the billions of unbanked. We want everyone to be able to mine, buy, and most of all USE Epic Cash — gamers, farmers, soccer moms, students, retirees, everyone really — even bankers (well once we defeat the banking industry)
We will continue building on the multilingual diversity of our global community adding support and advocacy groups in more countries in more languages.
Epic Cash is More than Money and its for Everyone.
Cryptodiffer Community
Almost, all cryptocurrencies are decentralized & no-one knows who owns that cryptocurrencies ! then also, why Privacy is needed? hats the advantages of Private coins?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
With a public transparent blockchain such as Bitcoin, you are permanently posting a detailed history of your money movements open for anyone to see (not just legitimate authorities, either!) — It would be considered crazy to post your credit card or bank statements to Twitter, but that’s what is happening every time you send a transaction that is not private. This excellent video from community contributor Spencer Lambert https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0blbfmvCq\_4 explains better than I can.
Privacy is not just for criminals, it’s for everyone. Do you want your landlord to increase the rent when he sees that you get a raise? Your insurance company to raise your healthcare costs because they see you buying too much ice cream? If you’re a business, do you want your employees to see how much money their coworkers make? Do you want your competitors to trace your supplier and customer relationships? Of course not. By privacy being default for everyone, cryptocurrency can be used in a much wider range of situations without unacceptable compromises.
Cryptodiffer Community
What are the main utility and real-life usage of the #EPIC As an investor, why should we invest in the #EPIC project as a long-term investment?
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
Epic Cash can be used as a Private and Fungible store of value, medium of exchange, and unit of account. As Epic Cash grows and becomes adopted it can be compared to how Bitcoin and Monero is used and adopted as well. As Epic is adopted by the masses, it can be accepted as a medium of exchange for store owners and as fungible payments without the worry of having money that is tainted. Epic Cash as a store of value may be a good long term aspect of investment to consider. Epic Cash carries an inelastic fixed supply economic model of 21 million coins. There will be 5 halvings which this month of June will be our first halving of epic. From a block reward of 16 Epic reduced to 8. If we look at BTC’s price action and history of their halvings it has been proven and show that there has been an increase in value due to the scarcity and from halvings a reduction of # of BTC’s mined per block. An inelastic supply model like Bitcoin provides proof of the circulating supply compared to the total supply by the history of it’s Price action which is evident in long term charts since the birth of Bitcoin. EPIC Plans to have 5 halvings before the year 2028 to match the emissions of Bitcoin which we call the singularity event. Below is a chart displaying our halvings model approaching singularity. Once bitcoin and cryptocurrency becomes adopted mainstream, the fungibility problem will be more noticed by the general public. Privacy coins and the features of fungibility/scalability will most likely be sought over. Right now a majority of people believe that all cryptocurrency is fungible. However, that is not true. We can already see Chainalysis confirming that they can trace and track and even for other well-known privacy coins today such as Z-Cash.
Cryptodiffer Community
  1. You aim to reach support from a global community, what are your plans to get spanish speakers involved into Epic Cash? And emerging markets like the african
  2. How am I secure I won’t be affected by receiving tainted money?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
Native speakers from our community are working to raise awareness in key markets such as mining in Argentina and Venezuela for Spanish (Roberto Navarro called Epic “the holy grail of cryptocurrency” and Ethiopia and certain North African countries that have the lowest electricity costs in the world. Remittances between USA and Latin American countries are expensive and slow, so Epic is also perfect for people to send money back home as well.
Cryptodiffer Community
Do EPICs in 2020 focus more on research and coding, or on sales and implementation?
Yoga Dude PR&Marketing at Epic Cash
We will definitely continue to work on research and coding, with emphasis on improved accessibility (especially via smartphones) usability, security and privacy.
In terms of financial infrastructure will continuing to add exchanges both KYC and non KYC.
Big part of our plans is in ongoing Marketing and PR outreach. The idea is to make Epic Cash a viral sensation of sorts. If we can get Epic Cash adopters to spread the word and tell their family, coworkers and friends about Epic Cash — there will be no stopping us and to help that happen we have a growing army of content creators, and supporters.
Everyone with skin in the game gets the benefit of advancing the cause.
Folks also, this isn’t an answer to the question but an example of a real-world Epic Cash content —
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtAVEqKGgqY
a challenge from one of our content creators to beat his 21 pull ups and get 100 epics! This has not been claimed yet — people need to step up 🙂 and to help that I will match another 100 Epic Cash to the first person to beat this
Cryptodiffer Community
I was watching some videos explaining how to send and receive transactions in EpicCash, which consists of ports and sending links, my question is why this is so, which, for now, looks complex?
Let’s talk about the economic model, can EpicCash comply with the concept of value reserve?
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
In V3, which is coming later this summer, Epic can be sent over Tor, which eliminates this issue of port opening, even though using tools like ngrok.io, it’s not necessarily as painful as directly configuring the router ports. Early Lightning Network had this issue as well and it’s something we have a plan to address via research into non-interactive transactions. “Fire and Forget” payments to an address, as people are used to in Bitcoin, is coming to Epic and we’re excited to develop functionality that other advanced mimblewimble coins don’t yet have. We are committed to constant improvement in usability and utility, to make our money system the ease of use leader.
We are involved in the project (anyone can join the Freeman Family) because we believe that simply by choosing to use a form of money that better aligns with our ideals, that we can make a positive change in the world. Some of my thoughts about how I got involved are here: https://medium.com/epic-cash/the-freeman-family-e3b9c3b3f166
Max Freeman Project Lead at Epic Cash
Huge thanks to our friends Maks and Vladyslav, we welcome everyone to come say hi at one of our friendly communities. It is extremely early in this journey, our market cap is only 0.5m right now, whereas the 3 other mimblewimble coins are at $20m, $30m and $100m respectively. Epic is a historic opportunity to follow in the footsteps of legends such as Bitcoin and Monero, and we hope to become the first Top 5 privacy coin project.
Xenolink Advisor at Epic Cash
Would like to Thank the Cryptodiffer Team and the Cryptodiffer community for hosting us and also engaging with us to learn more about Epic. If anyone else has more questions and wants to know more about EPIC , can find us at our telegram channel at https://t.me/EpicCash .
Yoga Dude Pr&Marketing at Epic Cash
Thank you, CryptoDiffer Team, and this wonderful Community!!!
Cryptodiffer TEAM
Thank you everyone for taking your time and asking great questions
Thank you for your time, it was an insightful session
Spread the love
submitted by EpicCashFrodo to epiccash [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low transaction score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to Anarcho_Capitalism [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to altcoin_news [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to cybersecurity [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to CryptoCurrencyTrading [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
But also more technical heuristics such as:
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to Crypto_General [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to cryptophile [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
But also more technical heuristics such as:
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to Bitcoincirclejerk [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to Bitcoin_Exposed [link] [comments]

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.

Privacy-o-meter — a free tool to assess the privacy level of your BTC transactions and the first step to defending yourself against heuristics used by blockchain surveillance companies.
Blockchair has released Privacy-o-meter in its public block explorer and API to measure the privacy level of Bitcoin transactions. The free feature makes use of 50 heuristics and allows visitors to look up how much information about their identity has been leaked just by searching for their transaction hash. In a later stage, wallets and exchanges will be able to use the feature to notify users about how much information will be leaked before sending out a transaction.
While Bitcoin is considered to be a privacy-oriented system, the blockchain is open to be analyzed by anyone, and there are numerous transaction tracing tools like Chainalysis, Elliptic, CipherTrace, and Crystal. These are paid tools and often only available to a handful of individuals and companies. Bitcoin users thus rarely have the opportunity to see how deep the rabbit hole goes regarding their privacy loss.
A transaction with a low privacy score
Blockchair launched a simple transaction scoring tool and will expand this further in the upcoming months. It currently uses indicators that reveal user information such as:
  • Is an address reused or not?
  • Is one of the outputs a rounded number, thus the recipient?
  • How many input addresses have been used?
But also more technical heuristics such as:
  • Which script or multi-sig type has been used to sign a transaction?
  • How are output scripts compared to input scripts?
  • How are inputs or outputs ordered?
As mentioned by Blockchair, transaction tracing is relatively simple as most users aren’t concerned enough about their privacy and often make ‘mistakes’ like sending round BTC amounts. Wallet providers are often also not highly concerned about user privacy. Taking the previous example in context, there are no warnings if a user tries to send a rounded amount.
A transaction with a high privacy score
In comparison with protocols such as Zcash, Monero and Dash, in the Bitcoin network there are no transaction obfuscating implementations, and due to the lack of scalability so-called Mixers are expensive and cumbersome to use.
Blockchair provides the privacy-o-meter for free as it hopes it will help Bitcoin users take some of their privacy back.
submitted by blockchair to CryptoNews [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Amazing news you might have missed (partnerships, new tools, new relationships)

I wanted to make this post right now when moral is (once again) at a low point. NANO is such a coin that is amazing and has an amazing community, yet it has to pass through many trials and tribulations to prove its own worth. Still NANO and the NANO FOUNDATION keeps on chugging, overcome each obstacle while only getting better. Yet the battle hasnt been won yet and we might face yet another dry season before rain season starts to happen.

A lot of you are well aware of the upcoming technical updates (V19 and V20) as this usually is the main focus of both the foundation and this sub. Because of that and the whole LIBRA annoucement overwelming the community at large, the latest news on business opportunities, new relationships and even partherships that brings direct exposure to the (targeted) public have been overlooked. All of this has been talked about in the weekly update (this medium post).

Now a quick note here (and a small jab to the community manager too) is that almost zero hype has been created from all of these GREAT news. If it was any other coin, even 1/10 of all these great changes would have been enough to cover the frontpage of CC and talked about in various blogposts/vlogs etc. We are talking about several Universities here that can have the option to use nano to pay for their lunch/coffee. That alone is HUGE and can be a great real life adoption as universities are places that usually are more friendlier towards innovation.

Lets dissect the weekly post a bit more and follow the links up to see what the announcements really mean. In the light of focussing mainly on business orientated news (partnerships, exposure, new relationships etc.), some things ofc will be skipped:

Interview Financial Times
First what is mentioned is the interview of Colin with financial times currency correspondent Eva Szalay. Here is her page on the official website of the Financial Times UK: https://www.ft.com/stream/ff54f58c-6708-45fa-8c26-5b5baa7eb794
Now i cant find the interview yet, so i take it hasnt been published yet. Still, if this happens, it would mean great exposure as the FT is seen as a credible source of news. This would expose NANO to real investors alone.

WIREX
Afterwards, the CEO of WIREX spoke:
Wirex CEO Pavel Mateev took to the stage afterward to discuss some of the challenges his company has faced in working to bridge the gap between cryptocurrency and traditional fiat currencies over the last five years. Pavel also took some time to outline Wirex’s intent to expand its services beyond Europe — to North America, Asia, and even Africa.

The fact that Wirex, which also have adopted NANO, speaks at a NANO conference already speaks of measures. Wirex on that note alone can be seen as a 'partner' of NANO, i.e. one of NANO's partnerships. Its interesting to note Wirex also intends to expand in to Africa.
For those who dont know what Wirex is, its a creditcard where you pay with crypto (and it says its accepted everywhere were visa is accepted too): https://wirexapp.com/ Within that context, NANO can already be used to buy regular things with through a creditcard from Wirex. This is yet another step for mainstream adoption.

Kappture
Still these are small things to consider (even though they do start to stack up!), the biggest announcement must be the partnership/adoption from Kappture:
Cutting-edge electronic point-of-sale device company, Kappture, presented their alpha integration of Nano into its merchant devices. The integration will mark the forward-thinking company’s first venture into offering users the opportunity to pay with cryptocurrency. With highly regarded institutions such as Saïd Business School and the University of West London among the users of the EPoS system, this integration will represent a significant step forward in the discovery of natural use cases of secure and decentralized cryptocurrency — with the ultrafast and fee-less transactions of Nano leading the way.

This might have been the biggest news of the week if Libra announcement didnt came out. Kappture adoption for NANO means exposure to a WILD range of publics. Please go to Kappture own website and see where there devices are being used. We are talking about:

- The Championships Wimbledon
- Football stadiums
- Opera house
- Cricket
- Rugy
- multiple universities (including Oxford) and business schools
- Several business clients including Peugeot

This is true adoption and major exposure to such a variety of people. These are mainly Europe/London based, which means NANO is set for adoption in the West (Europe). With wirex being a visa card where you can pay with NANO all over the world (as long as they accept visa), Kappture will give you the oppertunity to directly sell your NANO on several events/places through their ePOS system.

If that wasnt enough the FOUNDATION has come with its own ePOS system, that is crypto agnostic (i.o.w. it accepts all crypto) yet still is secure and private:

Appia
The much-anticipated unveiling of the Appia payment ecosystem capped the days' proceedings. Appia is a crypto agnostic service providing, amongst many other things, signed payment requests for strong customer protection. Built on the new Manta protocol, Appia focuses on security, privacy, and multi-channel capability. Appia will help simplify the process of both paying with cryptocurrency as a consumer and accepting it as a merchant.

This is not only amazing news for NANO, this is amazing news for the WHOLE crypto community! If it is cheap to make and easy to setup (targets that can be worked on), it could spread adoption all over the world.

Africa
Colin himself have said that developing countries will also become a business focus for the NANO foundation. Certain African countries already use digital cash called m-pesa and some have already become the first cashless society of earth. Its one of the reasons why Africa is very promising for blockchain currencies (as they can be trustless/permisionless/secure unlike m-pesa). Not only that, with Appia, Wirex and ofc the current (mobile/web) wallets and its tech, NANO FOUNDATION has strong tools for adoption in Africa.

Possible second layer privacy option
Now just think about NANO having a second layer privacy mixer (copying from the BANANO devs), and its hard not to be exited: https://medium.com/banano/introducing-camo-banano-bananos-privacy-layer-98a5bb0ecdb1. The library is already there. It can't be that hard to implement it, though its smart to first wait out and see how it works on BANANO (ironing all the bugs out) before implementing it on NANO. This is a fine example why it is extremely good for NANO to have a fork like BANANO, as it can become a testing ground for new tech (we really should be happy and Co exist/co work with each other in that front in my opinion).

This is part from the BANANO medium post, but its well worth to mention, especially the last part:
First of all, Camo BANANO Phase 1 as described here and available for now allows for confidential transactions, but not for real privacy yet. At the current stage, Camo BANANO is the equivalent of opening 20 BANANO accounts on your BANANO Vault and using all 20 accounts to do transactions, meaning that any person you’d interact with only knows 1/20th of your stack. Camo BANANO allows to make this process easier (as kind of a manual mixer) and thereby in its Phase 1 adds confidentiality to BANANO transactions as proof of concept.
Camo BANANO will, however, be further developed, and Phase 2 of Camo BANANO requires adding a new block type to the BANANO protocol, finally allowing for sum-of-squares private transactions.
Of interest for developers: Also released recently under MIT License and open to use for everyone, for every purpose (though it’s not guaranteed to be suitable for any purpose of course): BANANOjs library with Camo capability V 1.0 (check out the readme for the supported API and camo commands). BANANOjs is a JavaScript library that can be used to convert seeds to public keys, sign blocks, and more. It also has Camo BANANO functions, meaning any developer can send and receive transactions using the Camo BANANO L2 protocol, without doing this manually by using the Camo BANANO website.

These all on their own are worthy of their own medium post and should be talked about in vlogs/blogs etc. And i do wonder, with such wonderful news, why this all has been kept in a short medium post with not that even a lot of claps. These are major announcement yet are being kept quite for some reason. Maybe there is a reason for it though. As Libra has come and Bitcoin is taking off, maybe the marketing crew is abiding their time before dropping these bombs in to the public. Also, like i said, NANO is going to have to endure one last test, one last difficult price depression, before it has the chance to spread it wings.

TLDR:
- Financial times UK interview (exposure to serious investors)
- Wirex being a serious partner of NANO (also, paying with NANO world wide everywhere VISA is accepted!)
- Kappture partnership that includes exposure to several football/cricket/rugby clubs, theaters, universities (including Oxford), and other business (like Peugeot) - with this a good part of the Western/UK demography gets targeted, meaning immense exposure in the UK.
- Appia device, agnostic crypto ePOS to lower the bar accepting crypto in your store World Wide
- Oppertunities in Africa
- Possible second layer mixer for privacy option (through BANANO development)
submitted by Redac07 to nanocurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mixers

What possible ways are there to retrieve funds when sending money to a mixer that doesn’t forward the funds to the destination wallet.
Bitcoin mixer eu has done this and now ignores contact after initially trying to get me to run scripts on my wallet.
submitted by naston7070 to btc [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to ethtrader [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to bitcoin_uncensored [link] [comments]

The biggest cryptocurrency thefts in the last 10 years

In this article, we will try to remember all the major theft of cryptocurrencies over the past 10 years.
1. Bitstamp $5.3 mln (BTC), January 4th, 2015
On January 4, 2015, the operational hot wallet of Bitstamp announced that it was hacked by an anonymous hacker and 19,000 Bitcoins (worth of $5 million) were lost.
The initiation of the attack fell on November 4, 2014. Then Damian Merlak, the CTO of the exchange, was offered free tickets to punk rock festival Punk Rock Holiday 2015 via Skype, knowing that Merlak is interested in such music and he plays in the band. To receive the tickets, he was asked to fill out a participant questionnaire by sending a file named “Punk Rock Holiday 2015 TICKET Form1.doc”. This file contained the VBA script. By opening the file, he downloaded the malware on his computer. Although Merlak did not suspect wrong and has opened the "application form", to any critical consequences, this did not open access to the funds of exchange.
The attackers, however, did not give up. The attack continued for five weeks, during which hackers presented themselves as journalists, then headhunters.
Finally, the attackers were lucky. On December 11, 2014, the infected word document was opened on his machine by Bitstamp system administrator Luka Kodric, who had access to the exchange wallet. The file came to the victim by email, allegedly on behalf of an employee of the Association for computer science, although in fact, as the investigation showed, the traces of the file lead deep into Tor. Hackers were not limited to just one letter. Skype attacker pretending to be an employee of the Association for computing machinery, convinced that his Frame though to make international honor society, which required some paperwork. Kodric believed.
By installing a Trojan on Kodriс's computer hackers were able to obtain direct access to the hot wallet of the exchange. The logs show that the attacker, under the account of Kodric, gained access to the server LNXSRVBTC, where he kept the wallet file.dat, and the DORNATA server where the password was stored. Then the servers were redirected to a certain IP address that belongs to one of the providers of Germany.
There are still no official reports of arrests in this case. Obviously, the case is complicated by the fact that the hackers are outside the UK, and the investigation has to cooperate with law enforcement agencies in other countries.
2. GateHub $9.5 mln (XRP), June 1th, 2019
Hackers have compromised nearly 100 XRP Ledger wallets on cryptocurrency wallet service GateHub. The incident was reported by GateHub in a preliminary statement on June 6.
XRP enthusiast Thomas Silkjær, who first noticed the suspicious activity, estimates that the hackers have stolen nearly $10 million worth of cryptocurrency (23,200,000 XRP), $5.5 million (13,100,000 XRP) of which has already been laundered through exchanges and mixer services.
GateHub notes that it is still conducting an investigation and therefore cannot publish any official findings. Also, GateHub advises victims to make complaints to the relevant authorities of their jurisdiction.
3. Tether, $30.9 mln (USDT), November 19th, 2017
Tether created a digital currency called "US tokens" (USDT) — they could be used to trade real goods using Bitcoin, Litecoin and Ether. By depositing $1 in Tether, the user received 1 USD, which can be converted back into fiat. On November 19, 2017, the attacker gained access to the main Tether wallet and withdrew $ 30.9 million in tokens. For the transaction, he used a Bitcoin address, which means that it was irreversible.
To fix the situation, Tether took action by which the hacker was unable to withdraw the stolen money to fiat or Bitcoin, but the panic led to a decrease in the value of Bitcoin.
4. Ethereum, $31 mln (ETH), July 20th, 2017
On July 20, 2017, the hacker transferred 153,037 Ethers to $31 million from three very large wallets owned by SwarmCity, Edgeless Casino and Eternity. Unknown fraudster managed to change the ownership of wallets, taking advantage of the vulnerability with multiple signatures.
First, the theft was noticed by the developers of SwarmCity.
Further events deserve a place in history: "white hackers" returned the stolen funds, and then protected other compromised accounts. They acted in the same way as criminals, who stole funds from vulnerable wallets — just not for themselves. And it all happened in less than a day.
5. Dao (Decentralized Autonomous Organization) $70 mln (ETH), June 18th, 2016
On June 18, 2016, members of the Ethereum community noticed that funds were being drained from the DAO and the overall ETH balance of the smart contract was going down. A total of 3.6 million Ether (worth around $70 million at the time) was drained by the hacker in the first few hours. The attack was possible because of an exploit found in the splitting function. The attackes withdrew Ether from the DAO smart contract multiple times using the same DAO Tokens. This was possible due to what is known as a recursive call exploit.
In this exploit, the attacker was able to "ask" the smart contract (DAO) to give the Ether back multiple times before the smart contract could update its own balance. There were two main faults that made this possible: the fact that when the DAO smart contract was created the coders did not take into account the possibility of a recursive call, and the fact that the smart contract first sent the ETH funds and then updated the internal token balance.
It's important to understand that this bug did not come from Ethereum itself, but from this one application that was built on Ethereum. The code written for the DAO had multiple bugs, and the recursive call exploit was one of them. Another way to look at this situation is to compare Ethereum to the Internet and any application based on Ethereum to a website: if a website is not working, it doesn't mean that the Internet is not working, it simply means that one website has a problem.
The hacker stopped draining the DAO for unknown reasons, even though they could have continued to do so.
The Ethereum community and team quickly took control of the situation and presented multiple proposals to deal with the exploit. In order to prevent the hacker from cashing in the Ether from his child DAO after the standard 28 days, a soft-fork was voted on and came very close to being introduced. A few hours before it was set to be released, a few members of the community found a bug with the implementation that opened a denial-of-service attack vector. This soft fork was designed to blacklist all the transactions made from the DAO.
6. NiceHash, 4736.42 (BTC), December 6th, 2017
NiceHash is a Slovenian cryptocurrency hash power broker with integrated marketplace that connects sellers of hashing power (miners) with buyers of hashing power using the sharing economy approach.
On December 6, 2017, the company's servers became the target of attack. At first, Reddit users reported that they could not access their funds and make transactions — when they tried to log in, they were shown a message about a service interruption. In the end, it became known that the service had undergone a major cyberattack and 4736,42 Bitcoins disappeared without a trace.
Despite heavy losses, NiceHash was able to continue working, but CEO and founder Marco Koval resigned, giving way to a new team. The company managed to maintain the trust of investors and began to strengthen the protection of its systems.
7. Mt.Gox, 850000 (BTC), June 19th, 2011
The Hacking Of Mt.Gox was one of the biggest Bitcoin thefts in history. It was the work of highly professional hackers using complex vulnerabilities.
A hacker (or a group of hackers) allegedly gained access to a computer owned by one of the auditors and used a security vulnerability to access Mt.Gox servers, then changed the nominal value of Bitcoin to 1 cent per coin.
Then they brought out about 2000 BTC. Some customers, without knowing it, conducted transactions at this low price, a total of 650 BTC, and despite the fact that the hacking hit the headlines around the world, no Bitcoin could be returned.
To increase investor confidence, the company has compensated all of the stolen coins, placed most of the remaining funds in offline storage, and the next couple of years was considered the most reliable Bitcoin exchanger in the world.
However, it was only an illusion of reliability.
The problems of the organization were much more serious, and the management probably did not even know about them.
CEO of Mt.Gox, Mark Karpeles, was originally a developer, but over time he stopped delving into technical details, basking in the rays of glory — because he created the world's largest platform for cryptocurrency exchange. At that time Mt.Gox handled over 70% of all Bitcoin transactions.
And, of course, there were those who wanted to take advantage of the technological weakness of the service. At some point, hackers made it so that Bitcoins could be bought at any price, and within minutes millions of dollars worth of coins were sold — mostly for pennies. World prices for Bitcoin stabilized in a few minutes, but it was too late.
As a result, Mt.Gox lost about 850,000 Bitcoins. The exchange had to declare bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands of people lost money, and the Japanese authorities arrested CEO Mark Karpeles for fraud. He pleaded not guilty and was subsequently released. In 2014, the authorities restored some of the Bitcoins remaining at the old addresses, but did not transfer them to the exchange, and created a trust to compensate for the losses of creditors.
8. Coincheck, $530 mln, January 26th, 2018
The sum was astonishing, and even surpassed the infamous Mt.Gox hack.
While Mt.Gox shortly filed for bankruptcy following the hack, Coincheck has surprisingly remained in business and was even recently approved as a licensed exchange by Japan’s Financial Services (FSA).
Coincheck was founded in 2014 in Japan and was one of the most popular cryptocurrency exchanges in the country. Offering a wide variety of digital assets including Bitcoin, Ether, LISK, and NEM, Coincheck was an emerging exchange that joined the Japan Blockchain Association.
Since Coincheck was founded it 2014, it was incidentally not subject to new exchange registration requirements with Japan’s FSA — who rolled out a framework after Mt. Gox –, and eventually was a contributing factor to its poor security standards that led to the hack.
On January 26th, 2018, Coincheck posted on their blog detailing that they were restricting NEM deposits and withdrawals, along with most other methods for buying or selling cryptocurrencies on the platform. Speculation arose that the exchange had been hacked, and the NEM developers issued a statement saying they were unaware of any technical glitches in the NEM protocol and any issues were a result of the exchange’s security.
Coincheck subsequently held a high-profile conference where they confirmed that hackers had absconded with 500 million NEM tokens that were then distributed to 19 different addresses on the network. Totaling roughly $530 million at the time — NEM was hovering around $1 then — the Coincheck hack was considered the largest theft in the industry’s history.
Coincheck was compelled to reveal some embarrassing details about their exchange’s security, mentioning how they stored all of the NEM in a single hot wallet and did not use the NEM multisignature contract security recommended by the developers.
Simultaneously, the NEM developers team had tagged all of the NEM stolen in the hack with a message identifying the funds as stolen so that other exchanges would not accept them. However, NEM announced they were ending their hunt for the stolen NEM for unspecified reasons several months later, and speculation persisted that hackers were close to cashing out the stolen funds on the dark web.
Mainstream media covered the hack extensively and compared it to similar failures by cryptocurrency exchanges in the past to meet adequate security standards. At the time, most media coverage of cryptocurrencies was centered on their obscure nature, dramatic volatility, and lack of security. Coincheck’s hack fueled that narrative considerably as the stolen sum was eye-popping and the cryptocurrency used — NEM — was unknown to most in the mainstream.
NEM depreciated rapidly following the hack, and the price fell even more throughout 2018, in line with the extended bear market in the broader industry. Currently, NEM is trading at approximately $0.07, a precipitous fall from ATH over $1.60 in early January.
The extent of the Coincheck hack was rivaled by only a few other hacks, notably the Mt.Gox hack. While nominally Coincheck is the largest hack in the industry’s history, the effects of Mt.Gox were significantly more impactful since the stolen funds consisted only of Bitcoin and caused a sustained market correction as well as an ongoing controversy with the stolen funds and founder. Moreover, Mt.Gox squandered 6% of the overall Bitcoin circulation at the time in a market that was much less mature than it is today.
Despite the fallout, Coincheck is now fully operational and registered with Japan’s FSA.
As practice shows, people make mistakes and these mistakes can cost a lot. Especially, when we talk about mad cryptoworld. Be careful and keep your private keys in a safe place.
submitted by SwapSpace_co to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to use Bitcoin Mixer BitMix.Biz - YouTube Best Bitcoin Mixer 2020 - YouTube Bitcoin hack 2020 LATEST FREEBITCO IN 3BTC Hack script ... Bitcoin - following the correction script... so far How to use bitcoin mixer BestMixer.IO (EN) - YouTube

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How to use Bitcoin Mixer BitMix.Biz - YouTube

Good Bitcoin Mixer bitcoinmixer.io. Sign in to like videos, comment, and subscribe. BitMix.Biz - Anonymous Bitcoin Mixer. Most important purpose of BitMix.Biz is saving privacy of all our customers and clarity of their coins. What is a bitco... Best Bitcoin Mixer 2020 https://bit.ly/2YOv9KZ #Bitcoin #Mixer #Blender #Tumbler Best Bitcoin Mixer 2020 bitcoin blender addressbitcoin blender anleitung is ... Eugene & Samantha –Providing news, insight, and commentary on the cryptocurrency space Follow Us @ https://twitter.com/coffee_bitcoin https://www.facebook.co... Looking for a more full-featured learning experience? Would you prefer to get these videos, and more, in real time? Consider becoming a Patreon. Limited enrollment for personal attention and ...

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